Some soaking rain and a little more water to wade in! For the time being that is.

Vanesssa with a nice French Nymphed Farmington Brown!

 

Date:  10/29/10
Water Flow:  200 CFS
Visibility:  clear
Water Temp: 60°F
Water Condition:  very low
Access Point:  upper TMA

Hatches (in order of importance):
     AM:  Winter/Summer Caddis 20-24, Blue Wing Olives 22-28, and tiny Rusty Spinners 20-26,
     Midday:  Tan Caddis 18-20, Black Ants 14-18, Beetles 12-16.
     Evening:  Isonychia 10-14, and Cahills 12-14, Flying Ants 16-24.

"Shocking" the Farmington River

Comments:  Some rain has finally come and the river has moved to a more comfortable 200Cfs putting a little bit of water over resident trout!  Winter/Summer Caddis all our still going in the early a.m. hours.  Tiny Blue Winged Olives fill the air as well.  This has been a good reliable hatch with lots of fish taking the small BWO patterns off the top and micro mayflies fished as droppers or along th stream bottom.  When the spinners start to fall the fishing has been great on very small spinner patterns down to 26.  Nothing but tails, olive thread and a little poly wing on these and your done.
Tan Caddis have been hatching sporadically throughout the morning.  I like to fish these with a small X-Caddis tied with a CDC wing and a poly shuck.
Midday there have been a few flying ant hatches that were just spectacular with pools of rising trout to be found for miles it seems.  Every fish in the river rolling for them. Size is crucial here and sometimes these things can be as small as a 28 or so.
Iso’s are still getting it done in the evening with the nymphs and emergers catching many large trout, this meal being just to big to pass up.  Cahills have been spotty but I have seen them on a few occasions in some sections of the river and managed to take trout on them.
Last week the Farmington river received it’s yearly walk from those carrying the electric sticks and wielding fish barges.  I was glad that my daughters and I had the chance again to see them shock, measure, and release many fish while carrying many other large breeders up over the bank and into the trucks off to the hatchery to spawn a new generation of healthy Farmington river Brown trout.  I must say it is heartbreaking, to see them go but I’ll wish them a safe trip and look forward to their return in the spring.  Good luck on the river, see you soon.
JW

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