5 Proven Tactics to Help you Catch more Trout during the Hendrickson hatch this Spring.

Hendrickson Polish woven nymph

     Would you like to you catch more fish during the Hendrickson hatch this spring? There are quite a few ways to approach it, here are some good tactics to try. Some are easy and fast, while others require patience, and some exploration with new techniques, you choose which ones to employ.

     Before you, quite a few people have made up their minds to be more successful at catching fish on the Farmington during these early season hatches, when the fish can sometimes just not seem to respond to anything.  Through the successes and failures of those who went before you, there are many lessons that must be learned.  To make it less difficult for you to succeed, here are a few of the better tactics. The tactics with notably long lists of successful users before.

5 tactics quite likely to assist you in catching more trout during the Hendrickson and other early mayfly hatches this Spring.

1.      Fish with nymphs during the first week of the insects hatching. Choosing a nymph in the proper size and color is key. Turn a few rocks and look for some of the naturals before you choose the fly you will be fishing with. For best results you will need to change to some sort of a nymphing setup, there are quite a few out there I prefer my coiled sighters and a host of Euro methods including French/Spanish Nymphing. The other alternative that I like to use especially when its windy is Czech Nymphing with a football indicator or something similar. (more…)

  • Summertime action on the Farmington River!

    The summer is a wonderful time to enjoy the cool flows of the Farmington River. When the weather gets hot and balmy I look forward to the cool air that engulf the riverbank. Whether you find yourself dry fly fishing in a hatch of Sulphur Duns or probing the banks with large terrestrials, there is no doubt that the Farmington River in the midst of summer is a terrific place for any fly angler. Though the dry fly fishing can be great this time of year, a succesful fly angler must realize the importance of fly fishing nymphs to dredge the larger weary fish from their lies. The Farmington River is host to huge populations of Stoneflies and Caddis in many sizes that trout go nuts on during the summer months! Trout can be seen from the banks grubbing and turning stones along the river bottom flashing from side to side as they dislodge rocks and pick off their favorite food items. Many of these trout can be taken by a fly angler that is willing to incorporate a different fly fishing technique into his normal repetoire. No matter what your preference one thing is for certain. The Farmington River is a great place to frolic, bask in the sun and enjoy your summer with family and friends catching some beautiful trout. Good luck out there and hope to see you on the river soon.
    JW

  • Golden Gummy Stonefly Nymph



    Heres a nice little addition to your fly patterns. This fly is “money” on the Farmington and a solid tie for the box of any fly angler. This fly is designed to be very heavy and drift along the bottom, “rolling” in between rocks and boulders where trout lie waiting for food to pass by. That being said you should fish this fly in swift rocky runs and the current seams directly behind them where this insect flourishes. You can fish this with a Czech, Polish, Euro, or any other style of fly fishing nymphs, the key being the weight that keeps this bugger down in the strike zone.

  • Great resource for the CT. fly angler searching for many different species.

      If your a trout fisherman like me who’s perhaps looking to get on some stripers or smallmouth but find yourself a little too far away to keep good tabs on the fishing, this is a great resource for you. I was poking around this morning and stumbled upon this link with a lot of good solid info collected by the fishing community all across CT.

      There was some solid hatch info for the Farmington for the fly angler who’s not all that familiar with the river. Here is a brief decription of the fishing reports process as described by CT. DEP.

      The Weekly Fishing Report is a summary of fresh and saltwater fishing activity in Connecticut collected from tackle stores around the state. Phone calls to area tackle stores are made early in the week and the information is usually posted on the web site by the middle of the week. The reports run every week from Opening Day in April to the end of November and may also feature periodic reports of ice fishing activity during the winter months. The reports are available as pdf files. Here is the link: http://www.ct.gov/dep/cwp/view.asp?a=2696&q=322752&depNav_GID=1630

  • JW’s “Faint Glo ISO”

    A solid glowing, twilight pattern for those out there searching for those large trout that many times will only come to the surface to sip insects in the cover of darkness.  Enjoy!

    JW

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