Dog days of Summer on the Farmington River 2010.

Date: 8/9/I0

Water Flow: 200 CFS

Visibility: clear

Water Temp: 59F a.m.

Water Condition: low

Access Point: upper TMA

Hatches (in order of importance:

A.M.

Tricos 22-26

Winter/summer Caddis 18-22

Tan Caddis 16-18

Needhami 22-24

Midday

Ants, Beetles, and other terrestrials should do the trick.

P.M.

Isonychia 10-14

Anthopotamus 10-12

Comments: Tricos are coming off in the upper TMA, the Duns start showing up in the early a.m. shortly followed by the spinners into midmorning. I haven’t seen any blanket hatches of these insects by any means, hopefully this hatch will materialize into the lower sections of the river this week.

Winter/summer Caddis are still blowing up the rivers’ edge in the a.m. hours. This is my favorite hatch and it is still going on each morning from the crack of dawn into the late morning. This hatch could almost be fished 365 days a year here on the Farmington River.

Tan Caddis are coming off throughout the day and fish slash at them making loud and splashy rise forms, sometimes launching into a full body breech as they chase these emerging pupae.

Isonychia have been emerging in good numbers in the evening hours. We have been fishing them at last light and into the darkness. Usually shortly after sunset there is a very strong emergence and fish ruthlessly give chase. Anthopotamus or formally known as Potomanthus, nicknamed Golden Dun, hatch and emerge on the slower sections of the Farmington in fairly good numbers during the evening hours. Given their large size take off can be slow and clumsy causing many fish to give chase. Fishing a yellow parachute style fly during late evening can double as the Golden Dun spinner, which also can be seen at the same time as the emerging Duns.

The water is low but we are still having fun and catching lots of fish. I would like to especially thank my nephew Tyler for taking time out of his busy summer and spending it with my family here in Connecticut and on the Farmington River. Tyler, I speak for all of us here at JWflyfishing when I say “We had a great two weeks visiting with you and having you fish along our side.” We look forward to doing it again. Great luck out there to all!

  • Howling at the moon!

    Action! At Last Light. Stack the deck in your Favor!

    Have you ever truly realized the potential of flyfishing in low light conditions? Large trout have a tendency to feed more actively in dim conditions. The cover of darkness is a great way for trout to avoid predators and take advantage of food sources that becomes available under these conditions. These food sources can be comprised of various mayfly spinners in a whole array of sizes. Some spinners can come in very small sizes and can be hard to spot lying flat on the water so keep your eyes peeled and look at the water closely if you are not sure of their presence. Some mayflies hatch right into darkness and patterns that imitate them are excellent pattern choices. Take Isonychia for example, the duns can continue to emerge right into total darkness and throughout the night. I love to fish these bad boys in size 10-12 after dusk while listening to the fish come up and sip well into nightfall. Sipping trout actually make a slurping sound when feeding. Listening is a very effective way of detecting strikes in this night game.

    Low light conditions also eliminate many obstacles between fishermen and the feeding trout. First it allows you to use much larger tippet sizes because of the low visibility. The increased breaking strength of a heavier tippet is always handy when trying to land larger trout. Next, fish aren’t as easily spooked by your flyline and leader landing near them. As they feed on naturals and the light decreases, they are comforted by a darkened sky and the natural presence of fewer fishermen. Many have already left the water when the action starts ramping up. Fish typically develop a rhythm of picking off insects as they float in the drift. At times the feeding frenzy can be furious leaving them vulnerable to a well placed fly.

    This low light condition is not specific to nighttime, it also applies to early morning when the sun hasn’t fully risen. Fish can feed heavily on spinners in the early morning hours, creating a wonderful opportunity to get on some heavy fish. Many trout cruise pocket water and back eddies during early morning hours slurping up spinners and any insects left from the night before. There’s nothing like leftovers! Some types of Caddis become active in the morning causing trout to opportunistically feed on Caddis larvae and pupae during the wee hours of the morning. These make excellent fly choices.

    Often large trout cannot be seen sipping insects from long distances as the light recedes or reappears, causing many fly fisherman to overlook a subtle take from a large trout or simply not see them feeding at all. Don’t let this happen to you. When darkness moves in or the sun is far from rising over the mountains, move quietly and slowly to feeding trout. The goal being to perfectly present your fly at shorter distances with laser like precision; Meanwhile staying ever keen using your other senses to detect the presence of nearby gently sipping trout. The next time your on the water and the sun is on its way up or down put this logic to good use and take away the trouts instinctive advantages over you. With a little luck you will put a few more trout in your net. Good luck!

     JW

  • Farmington River still Spinning with Caddis moving in!

     

    Date:  5/17/10

    Water Flow:  450cfs

    Visibility:  clear

    Water Temp:  51am

    Water Condition:  good

    Access Point: Upper TMA

    Hatches (in order of importance):  5/17/2010 – The Farmington is flowing TMA at 450cfs. The Hendrickson hatch # 12-14 is just about over but still can be found below Hogback Dam on the uppermost reaches of the river.   Hendrickson Spinners #12-14 and Rusty Spinners #16-20 are falling in the evening. Winter/Summer Caddis #18-22 have been hatching close to daybreak and producing during the early hours of the day on the slower sections of the River. Blue Wing Olives #16-20 have been hatching in the early evening accounting for some nice trout.Tan Caddis #16-18, and Green Caddis #16-20 are now hatching from Collinsville to New Hartford.  March Browns/Grey Fox #12-14 have also been reported on the lower river in  Collinsville to Pleasant Valley.

    Comments:  This past week the fishing was great in the early morning hours busting many fish with Spanish and French Nymphing on caddis patterns. The evenings have been fishing good with Rusty spinners and small caddis emergers.  The caddis have been coming off religiously for an hour before dark. Trout have been feeding on these Caddis explosively throughout the evening. Many of these fish feeding on Caddis cannot resist a large spinner drifted over them, and will suck it up. This past week has brought some nice fish and a few great opportunities to catch some trout with some old friends on the river. The rainy conditions over the next few days should bring a great opportunity to nymph on the Farmington with the possibility of some higher water conditions. Hit the seams and dredge up some big browns.
    JW

  • Hendricksons “Meet the trout” on the Farmington.

    Hendrickson Mayfly (male with large tomato eyes and female with dark eyes and light body)

     

    Date: 4-23-10

    Water Flow: 311cfs

    Visibility: clear

    Water Temp: 51F

    Water Condition: good

    Access Point: below lower TMA

    Hatches (in order of importance): Hendrickson 12-16, Caddis 20-22, Bwo 18-22.

    Comments: Well we finally got a great look at the Hendrickson hatch today. My daughters and I watched mayflies hatch from 2pm to 4pm when the hatch tapered off. Males with there tomato round eyes, and females with their small black eyes poured off the small riffle as my girls swooped them up for inspection in their butterfly net. I returned to the water in the evening hours and saw lots of spinners gathering over the water. A few spinners hit the water and the fish gobbled them up quickly. I threw on a size 12 Rusty Spinner and took several stocked fish. This was the first look at this years stocked browns and man they are fat! The next few day will be a great time to hit the water and look for fish rising to Hendrickson hatches in the afternoon and spinnerfalls in the evening. Caddis are still blowing the water up in the am making for exciting fishing as well as the Bwo’s that hit the water along with them.

  • Caddis AM, Hedricksons getting stronger!

     

    Date:  4-21-10

    Water Flow:  329

    Visibility:  Clear

    Water Temp:  47F am 

    Water Condition:  Good

    Access Point:  Lower TMA

    Hatches (in order of importance):  Caddis pupae 18- 22, Bwo 18-20, Mahogany Duns 16-18, Rusty Spinner 14-18 in the evening.

    Comments:  The morning Caddis hatches are still going strong bringing lots of trout to the surface.  There have been some Bwo mixed in with them and I have been taking fish on them as well.  Yesterday morning I used all my pupae in my box up and I started casting 18 Bwo’s and the trout took it eagerly.  I have been spotting Hendricksons  yesterday fish were feeding on them from Unionville to People’s State Forest.  With the weather looking good for the next couple of days and warm temps this hatch should progress nicely.  The Dep will be stocking the TMA this week and just in time with the Hendricksons well on their way.  Be on the lookout for the evening spinnerfall!  Good luck!