Golden Gummy Stonefly Nymph



Heres a nice little addition to your fly patterns. This fly is “money” on the Farmington and a solid tie for the box of any fly angler. This fly is designed to be very heavy and drift along the bottom, “rolling” in between rocks and boulders where trout lie waiting for food to pass by. That being said you should fish this fly in swift rocky runs and the current seams directly behind them where this insect flourishes. You can fish this with a Czech, Polish, Euro, or any other style of fly fishing nymphs, the key being the weight that keeps this bugger down in the strike zone.

  • Hendrickson Vs. Kahle Worm – Two Heavyweight flies, One Winner!


    There was some great fishing to be had along the banks of the Farmington River this spring, the weather made some of the Hendrickson dry fly fishing very challenging, but with a very solid Plan “B” the results were a whole lot of fun and some terrific scenery.   Continue reading

  • Salmon River-Renew your vows of “Chasing Chrome” this spring!

     
       
    Salmon River, Pulaski NY-  As Spring slowly materializes the opening of the upper fly zone in Altmar will attract many anglers looking to hook into some fresh lake run fish to the Salmon River.  My recent trip last fall has me anxiuos for more!

          After the early ride from northwestern CT I feast my eyes for the first time on one of the most fantastic Great Lakes fishery along with the rising sun.  I throw my gear on and as soon as I reach the river I am greeted with the smell of  dead fish from the recent runs of  salmon.  These ghastly beast are strewn about the river with the current faintly animating their dead flesh as they stink to high heavens!  The smell doesn’t last long though, my predatory instincts override my sense of smell as I begin to assess the river.. after seeing a shadow here and a shadow there, the potential of this fishery becomes immeditately apparent (Dorothy, you are not, in Kansas anymore!).  

         Dead drifting egg patterns, small Stonefly nymphs, and Sucker Spawn type flies account for a good number of fish and when combined with a 6 or 7 weight fly rod, decent reel, and floating line, are all that is really required to get you in on the action there. 

         Weight is an important factor here and any angler should be in possession of a container of lead-free shot, to get his flies down to the bottom of the river.  No need to worry about some crazy 60-70ft presentation you think those steelhead guys might be doing.  A short upstream czech nymph cast and  deadrift presentation works well on runs where fish periodically move through and rest along current seams. 

         For many fisherman this place truly holds the “Fish of a Lifetime” and will leave most angler chomping at the bit for a return visit.  This was a great trip, I would highly recommend to any fishing fanatic that has never been there to drop what you are doing and to plan a trip to the Salmon River, Pulaski NY this spring and renew your vows of “Chasing Chrome” with back breaking rod bends, ferocious runs, and epic battles these Great Lakes trout and salmon have to offer!I anxiously wait for my next opportunity to return to the Salmon River and enjoy its great fishing.  Hope to see you soon on the river!  There are some great photos already in our Flickr’ stream located at the bottom right hand corner of our website.

    JW

  • Rain, Rain, gone away. Farmington River pick your day they all look nice through the weekend!

    Thank god for cellphones!

    Date:  10/7/10

    Water Flow:  625Cfs

    Visibility:  ok

    Water Temp:   

    Water Condition:  slightly stained 

    Access Point:  Upper TMA

    Hatches (in order of importance):

            AM: Winter/Summer Caddis 20-24 

                   BWO 20-24

                   Rusty Spinners 20-24     

      Midday:  Tan Caddis 18-20

                     Ants and Beetles 12-16

     Evening:  Isonychia 10-12

                         Tan Caddis 18-20

                         Rusty Spinners 20-24     

    Comments:  Water is running high again after the recent rains.  Not many fish have been rising in the early mornings but a few are sipping small Spinners and Winter/Summer Caddis.  I have been fishing down for them with Caddis larvae and Stonefly nymphs until I notice fish visibly rising then grabbing my dry rod and throwing small spinners or W/S Caddis.  Olives are starting to gather on the riffles in the evening.  Not many trout have been coming up for the tiny spinners.  However I have been taking lots of fish on small Pheasantail nymphs down to size 22 imitating small BWO nymphs.  A pattern that has been tearing it up out there for a good couple of months now is Aaron Jasper’s Pineapple Express.  I want to thank Aaron for his great patterns and here is the url to the video of Pineapple Express TPO fly of the Month June 2010.  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sdrtvM4F6l4

    JW's pineapple

     

    The fly I have pictured here is just a spinnoff of the Pineapple Express that I tie a bit differently.  This fly is mainly a small pheasantail with a rusty, yellowish dubbing mix for a thorax and a hot collar of UTC fire orange thread for the hotspot.  Stonefly 10-14 and Isonychia nymphs 10-12 have been very effective in the high water.  I like French Nymphing these patterns in current seams and along shelf water.  The rain is supposed to stop and with moderate temperatures this weekend you can count on the fishing being good as the water recedes.  Good luck to all out there this weekend.  Hook em up!

    JW