Summertime action on the Farmington River!

The summer is a wonderful time to enjoy the cool flows of the Farmington River. When the weather gets hot and balmy I look forward to the cool air that engulf the riverbank. Whether you find yourself dry fly fishing in a hatch of Sulphur Duns or probing the banks with large terrestrials, there is no doubt that the Farmington River in the midst of summer is a terrific place for any fly angler. Though the dry fly fishing can be great this time of year, a succesful fly angler must realize the importance of fly fishing nymphs to dredge the larger weary fish from their lies. The Farmington River is host to huge populations of Stoneflies and Caddis in many sizes that trout go nuts on during the summer months! Trout can be seen from the banks grubbing and turning stones along the river bottom flashing from side to side as they dislodge rocks and pick off their favorite food items. Many of these trout can be taken by a fly angler that is willing to incorporate a different fly fishing technique into his normal repetoire. No matter what your preference one thing is for certain. The Farmington River is a great place to frolic, bask in the sun and enjoy your summer with family and friends catching some beautiful trout. Good luck out there and hope to see you on the river soon.
JW

  • Great resource for the CT. fly angler searching for many different species.

      If your a trout fisherman like me who’s perhaps looking to get on some stripers or smallmouth but find yourself a little too far away to keep good tabs on the fishing, this is a great resource for you. I was poking around this morning and stumbled upon this link with a lot of good solid info collected by the fishing community all across CT.

      There was some solid hatch info for the Farmington for the fly angler who’s not all that familiar with the river. Here is a brief decription of the fishing reports process as described by CT. DEP.

      The Weekly Fishing Report is a summary of fresh and saltwater fishing activity in Connecticut collected from tackle stores around the state. Phone calls to area tackle stores are made early in the week and the information is usually posted on the web site by the middle of the week. The reports run every week from Opening Day in April to the end of November and may also feature periodic reports of ice fishing activity during the winter months. The reports are available as pdf files. Here is the link: http://www.ct.gov/dep/cwp/view.asp?a=2696&q=322752&depNav_GID=1630

  • Hendrickson Vs. Kahle Worm – Two Heavyweight flies, One Winner!


    There was some great fishing to be had along the banks of the Farmington River this spring, the weather made some of the Hendrickson dry fly fishing very challenging, but with a very solid Plan “B” the results were a whole lot of fun and some terrific scenery.   Continue reading

  • Farmington fly fishing Memorial Day Weekend 6/1/11

    Nice trout Stan!

    This Memorial Weekend was a stellar weekend for fishing the Farmington River.  The weather stayed good and offered some nice, warm, sunny conditions to fish.  There were lots of Caddis pouring off the river from noontime into the late evening.  Fish on quick water riffles fed on the smorgasbord of Caddis emergers ans the still water fish preferred the adult patterns.  I saw many large fish taken this weekend as the trout consistently fed on the many types of Caddis making their appearance on the Farmington River.  At times fish needed to be hunted down as most fish let Caddis roll over them one after another  and  at other times some fishermen were just in the right place at the right time as large concentrations of insects emerged from the depths.  Fishing nymphs this weekend was especially rewarding for me and many others that I talked with along the river.  Many Caddis patterns such as czech Caddis, Lafontaine Caddis patterns,and many others were good performers in #14-16.  My Kahle worms also caught fish for me all weekend used as my anchor fly.  Finally we have spotted some #16 Sulphurs in the upper TMA and a few fish were caught earlier in the week on the Sulphur emergers.

    A well colored Farmington River meat eater!

    Thanks Mike S. for the great picture.

  • Bring on the Hendrickson’s!

    Date:  4/28/11

    Water flow:  650 CFS

    Visibility:  Clear       

    Water temp:  40*F early a.m.

    Water conditions:  A little high due to recent rains.

    Hatches:  Hendrickson’s 12-14, Winter/Summer Caddis 18-22, Mahogany Duns/Little Blue Quills 16-18, Blue Wing Olives 16-20

    Comments:  There have been a few Hendrickson’s hatching midday at the end of the upper TMA , and I have noticed a few further upstream as well.  Some fish are responding and violently slashing at the emergers and most times letting the adults drift by.  Dry fly fishing can be frustrating and many anglers are bedazzled by the large numbers of floating mayflies that fish ignore.  In the weeks to come trout will wise up, quickly identifying drifting mayflies as a significant food source and start taking them on the top as well as the nymphal forms.  In the meantime many fish have been put in the net by actively fishing the nymph or emerger patterns deeper in the water column at midday when these mayflies are most actively hatching. 

         Mahogany Duns and Little Blue quills are hatching as well, though they are in much smaller numbers and overshadowed by the Hendrickson.  These smaller hatches often take place in back eddies and along the stream bank, so be on the lookout for action in these areas and react accordingly. 

         Winter/Summer Caddis are hitting the water shortly after sunrise with good numbers of fish feeding on them in slack water areas of the river.  The pupae is the key player here, with long legs like oars these insects breastroke to shoreline grass, rocks, and debris to hatch, and its this swimming motion that drive trout crazy.  Fish your pupae pattern with twitches of the rod tip to emulate this action. 

         Most of our fishing is still being done with French Nymphing techniques especially in the high water that has been produced by spring rains and Dam fluctuations.  This method really shines in these high water scenarios.  Leaving the stream bank is rarely needed to land some hefty resident browns that escape the high water flows by migrating to milder currents near the shore.  For those of you employing these methods here are some good fly choices.  JW’s own Kahle worms in lime green and pink have been doing a bang up job on the Farmington for months now and are still producing. 

         Golden Stones 6-12 is another excellent pattern with a million ways to tie them, I like to use a simple straight forward, easy, and durable tie such as polish woven nymphs.   Appearing the same from all sides when awash and having the light underbelly contrast with the darker top, combined with a tungsten bead makes this fly a great choice in fast turbulent runs.   

    Male Hendrickson on left and Female on right

    Pheasantail Nymphs 14-20 are a good choice mimicking many different mayfly species.  Green Rock Worm 12-16 are an essential on the Farmington with tons of these insects showing up in stream samples taken with a kick seine.  As a reminder JWFlyfishing has finally been able to get a goodies store squared away and if you are in the market for some JWSlinky coiled sighters this is just the news you have been waiting for, so check it out!  We even have the ½ and ½ coiled sighters (my own personal favorite) with two contrasting colors so streamside vegetation and sunsets become a hindrance of the past.  Good luck out there and go catch some fish!

    JW