Rain, Rain, gone away. Farmington River pick your day they all look nice through the weekend!

Thank god for cellphones!

Date:  10/7/10

Water Flow:  625Cfs

Visibility:  ok

Water Temp:   

Water Condition:  slightly stained 

Access Point:  Upper TMA

Hatches (in order of importance):

        AM: Winter/Summer Caddis 20-24 

               BWO 20-24

               Rusty Spinners 20-24     

  Midday:  Tan Caddis 18-20

                 Ants and Beetles 12-16

 Evening:  Isonychia 10-12

                     Tan Caddis 18-20

                     Rusty Spinners 20-24     

Comments:  Water is running high again after the recent rains.  Not many fish have been rising in the early mornings but a few are sipping small Spinners and Winter/Summer Caddis.  I have been fishing down for them with Caddis larvae and Stonefly nymphs until I notice fish visibly rising then grabbing my dry rod and throwing small spinners or W/S Caddis.  Olives are starting to gather on the riffles in the evening.  Not many trout have been coming up for the tiny spinners.  However I have been taking lots of fish on small Pheasantail nymphs down to size 22 imitating small BWO nymphs.  A pattern that has been tearing it up out there for a good couple of months now is Aaron Jasper’s Pineapple Express.  I want to thank Aaron for his great patterns and here is the url to the video of Pineapple Express TPO fly of the Month June 2010.  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sdrtvM4F6l4

JW's pineapple

 

The fly I have pictured here is just a spinnoff of the Pineapple Express that I tie a bit differently.  This fly is mainly a small pheasantail with a rusty, yellowish dubbing mix for a thorax and a hot collar of UTC fire orange thread for the hotspot.  Stonefly 10-14 and Isonychia nymphs 10-12 have been very effective in the high water.  I like French Nymphing these patterns in current seams and along shelf water.  The rain is supposed to stop and with moderate temperatures this weekend you can count on the fishing being good as the water recedes.  Good luck to all out there this weekend.  Hook em up!

JW

  • Dog days of Summer on the Farmington River 2010.

    Date: 8/9/I0

    Water Flow: 200 CFS

    Visibility: clear

    Water Temp: 59F a.m.

    Water Condition: low

    Access Point: upper TMA

    Hatches (in order of importance:

    A.M.

    Tricos 22-26

    Winter/summer Caddis 18-22

    Tan Caddis 16-18

    Needhami 22-24

    Midday

    Ants, Beetles, and other terrestrials should do the trick.

    P.M.

    Isonychia 10-14

    Anthopotamus 10-12

    Comments: Tricos are coming off in the upper TMA, the Duns start showing up in the early a.m. shortly followed by the spinners into midmorning. I haven’t seen any blanket hatches of these insects by any means, hopefully this hatch will materialize into the lower sections of the river this week.

    Winter/summer Caddis are still blowing up the rivers’ edge in the a.m. hours. This is my favorite hatch and it is still going on each morning from the crack of dawn into the late morning. This hatch could almost be fished 365 days a year here on the Farmington River.

    Tan Caddis are coming off throughout the day and fish slash at them making loud and splashy rise forms, sometimes launching into a full body breech as they chase these emerging pupae.

    Isonychia have been emerging in good numbers in the evening hours. We have been fishing them at last light and into the darkness. Usually shortly after sunset there is a very strong emergence and fish ruthlessly give chase. Anthopotamus or formally known as Potomanthus, nicknamed Golden Dun, hatch and emerge on the slower sections of the Farmington in fairly good numbers during the evening hours. Given their large size take off can be slow and clumsy causing many fish to give chase. Fishing a yellow parachute style fly during late evening can double as the Golden Dun spinner, which also can be seen at the same time as the emerging Duns.

    The water is low but we are still having fun and catching lots of fish. I would like to especially thank my nephew Tyler for taking time out of his busy summer and spending it with my family here in Connecticut and on the Farmington River. Tyler, I speak for all of us here at JWflyfishing when I say “We had a great two weeks visiting with you and having you fish along our side.” We look forward to doing it again. Great luck out there to all!

  • Summertime on the Farmington River.

    Date: 7/20/10
    Water Flow: 220 CFS
    Visibility: clear
    Water Temp: 60F a.m.

    Water Condition: low-water

    Access Point: upper TMA

    Hatches (in order of importance): winter/summer caddis 20-22 a.m., Needhami duns 22-24 midmorning, Isonychia 10-14 p.m., midges 22-20 a.m.

    Comments: The winter summer caddis hatch continues to be a spectacle during the a.m. hours. Many fish line up on soft water seams rising to take these tiny Pupae as they row along in the meniscus to the shoreline to finish their emergence on the rocks and logs near the edge of the river. I had one of my best days on the river this past weekend when this hatch came on at 6a.m. and started winding down at 11a.m., we caught trout on everything from foam pupae patterns to french nymphing small winter/summer caddis larvae patterns.

         Needhami Duns are rolling off the water midmorning, their small spinners can drive fisherman nuts. Their small sizes make them very difficult to see on the water. The Duns however can be recognized flying in the air by their long sweeping tails.

         Isonychia have been filling the skies in the evening hours. Trout like these tasty morsels and will move greater distances from their feeding lanes to swipe at this super sized evening hatcher. When these insects start coming off the water in good numbers I prefer to fish a CDC Iso emerger pattern then as darkness sets in I switch off to a larger Iso parachute pattern, which doubles as a big spinner pattern and I fish this into the darkness.

         If you are fishing mid day I would suggest using terrestrials such as small ants, beetles, crickets, and hoppers. For all those fishing nymphs you can’t be beat fishing green caddis larvae 14-18 and Isonychia nymphs 10-14, with golden stone flies 6-12 rounding out the mix. Fishing on the Farmington River has gotten tougher forcing fishermen to take their tippet down to 7 or 8X when fishing smaller hatches such as winter summer caddis pupae and Needhami Spinners.  Good luck on the river. Remember, if you’re fishing into the afternoon hours, bring plenty of water it has been scorching out there on the river after 10a.m.

    JW

  • Farmington Needhami, Breakfast of Champions!

    Needhami Dun

    Date: 7/5/10

    Water Flow: 250 CFS

    Visibility: clear

    Water Temp: 58F

    Water Condition: good

    Access Point: upper TMA

    Hatches (in order of importance): a.m. Needhami Spinners size 22-24, winter/summer caddis size 18-22, p.m.Sulphurs size 16-20, Isonychia size 10-14, Cream Cahills 14-16, Rusty spinners 12-20.

    Comments: Like clockwork the trout continue feeding on winter summer caddis in the mornings, with foam pupae patterns performing the best,and many trout coming to the net on small pupae patterns while nymphing. When the Needhami spinners hit the water in mid morning, trout boil to take them. You must look at the water closely to see these tiny spinners. The long tails are a dead giveaway. The key after recognizing these insects is to lighten your tippet size and accurately cast to feeding fish making sure your drifts are drag-free.

    The evening Sulphur Hatch remains good with lots of Duns coming off the water and good numbers of fish feeding on them. I am having good luck fishing a Sulphur emerger as a dropper off of my dry fly. There are also Isonychia mixed in, with plenty of fish willing to strike at these big meaty flies. Gently tickling or twitching Isonychia patterns replicates their struggles to emerge. Trout will travel great distances and strike hard and fast at the commotion caused by these insects.

    There have been some Cream Cahills sneaking into the mix of insects. I have observed several fish whom at first glance appeared to be taking Sulphurs, upon further investigation they were actually taking Cream Cahill spinners exclusively.

    Spinners can reliably be seen overhead in the late evening sky. Their dark fluttering silhouettes drift by in the soon to be darkness in a vast array of sizes. Rusty spinners right before dark and before daybreak are still accounting for our bigger trout.

    Happy Hunting! 

    JW

  • Farmington River Serenity and Sulphurs!

     

    Date: 6/23/10

    Water Flow: 236

    Visibility: good

    Water Temp: 52*F am

    Water Condition: low

    Access Point: upper TMA

     Hatches (in order of importance): Sulphurs 16-20, March Brown/Grey Fox 12-14, Isonychia 10-12, Winter/Summer Caddis 18-20 am, Blue Winged Olives 16-20 evenings and foul weather, Tan and Green Caddis 16-20

     Comments: The water this week has fallen below 300 Cfs, the need for much finer tippets will be upon us soon. The Sulphur hatches in the afternoon have been lackluster for me and I have purposely been fishing the sulphurs that are coming off in the late evening, taking nice trout on both the dun and the emerger. When nymphing I use tags on my leader to attach emerger patterns, but when I am fishing dries I drop an emerger off the bend of the hook. Some people say its a pain and I couldn’t disagree with them more, it catches fish period. Not to mention how many times it saved my neck when fish were feeding exclusively on emergers. Sulphur spinners have been working well at last light, some fish have been feeding solely on them and its taken me a while to catch on. When I responded I went straight to a Sulphur spinner and Bingo! The presence of the Isonychia has me overflowing with joy! I love these bugs, they are big and meaty and easily seen and the fish just love them. I had an outing this weekend where I made it a point to catch fish on all stages of Isonychia and the fish responded eagerly. The morning Winter/Summer Caddis hatches are still producing good numbers of trout, when the sun pokes over the trees its scary what you might turn on a 18-22 foam Caddis Pupae. French Nymphing any of these hatches has been dynamite producing good healthy fish. I would recommend fishing with this method at the front end of a hatch before fish are feeding on duns. I have been fishing with less weight and adding wetflies or emerger patterns as my dropper. I lost a fish the other day in a foot of water. I thought I was snagged and I pulled on the rod twice to try and free it, then it pulled back and with a head shake and my 5x fluorocarbon gave under the strain. Enjoy the warmer weather and good luck to you all and we at JWFlyfishing hope to see you soon on the Farmington River.

    JW