Salmon River-Renew your vows of “Chasing Chrome” this spring!

 
   
Salmon River, Pulaski NY-  As Spring slowly materializes the opening of the upper fly zone in Altmar will attract many anglers looking to hook into some fresh lake run fish to the Salmon River.  My recent trip last fall has me anxiuos for more!

      After the early ride from northwestern CT I feast my eyes for the first time on one of the most fantastic Great Lakes fishery along with the rising sun.  I throw my gear on and as soon as I reach the river I am greeted with the smell of  dead fish from the recent runs of  salmon.  These ghastly beast are strewn about the river with the current faintly animating their dead flesh as they stink to high heavens!  The smell doesn’t last long though, my predatory instincts override my sense of smell as I begin to assess the river.. after seeing a shadow here and a shadow there, the potential of this fishery becomes immeditately apparent (Dorothy, you are not, in Kansas anymore!).  

     Dead drifting egg patterns, small Stonefly nymphs, and Sucker Spawn type flies account for a good number of fish and when combined with a 6 or 7 weight fly rod, decent reel, and floating line, are all that is really required to get you in on the action there. 

     Weight is an important factor here and any angler should be in possession of a container of lead-free shot, to get his flies down to the bottom of the river.  No need to worry about some crazy 60-70ft presentation you think those steelhead guys might be doing.  A short upstream czech nymph cast and  deadrift presentation works well on runs where fish periodically move through and rest along current seams. 

     For many fisherman this place truly holds the “Fish of a Lifetime” and will leave most angler chomping at the bit for a return visit.  This was a great trip, I would highly recommend to any fishing fanatic that has never been there to drop what you are doing and to plan a trip to the Salmon River, Pulaski NY this spring and renew your vows of “Chasing Chrome” with back breaking rod bends, ferocious runs, and epic battles these Great Lakes trout and salmon have to offer!I anxiously wait for my next opportunity to return to the Salmon River and enjoy its great fishing.  Hope to see you soon on the river!  There are some great photos already in our Flickr’ stream located at the bottom right hand corner of our website.

JW

  • Howling at the moon!

    Action! At Last Light. Stack the deck in your Favor!

    Have you ever truly realized the potential of flyfishing in low light conditions? Large trout have a tendency to feed more actively in dim conditions. The cover of darkness is a great way for trout to avoid predators and take advantage of food sources that becomes available under these conditions. These food sources can be comprised of various mayfly spinners in a whole array of sizes. Some spinners can come in very small sizes and can be hard to spot lying flat on the water so keep your eyes peeled and look at the water closely if you are not sure of their presence. Some mayflies hatch right into darkness and patterns that imitate them are excellent pattern choices. Take Isonychia for example, the duns can continue to emerge right into total darkness and throughout the night. I love to fish these bad boys in size 10-12 after dusk while listening to the fish come up and sip well into nightfall. Sipping trout actually make a slurping sound when feeding. Listening is a very effective way of detecting strikes in this night game.

    Low light conditions also eliminate many obstacles between fishermen and the feeding trout. First it allows you to use much larger tippet sizes because of the low visibility. The increased breaking strength of a heavier tippet is always handy when trying to land larger trout. Next, fish aren’t as easily spooked by your flyline and leader landing near them. As they feed on naturals and the light decreases, they are comforted by a darkened sky and the natural presence of fewer fishermen. Many have already left the water when the action starts ramping up. Fish typically develop a rhythm of picking off insects as they float in the drift. At times the feeding frenzy can be furious leaving them vulnerable to a well placed fly.

    This low light condition is not specific to nighttime, it also applies to early morning when the sun hasn’t fully risen. Fish can feed heavily on spinners in the early morning hours, creating a wonderful opportunity to get on some heavy fish. Many trout cruise pocket water and back eddies during early morning hours slurping up spinners and any insects left from the night before. There’s nothing like leftovers! Some types of Caddis become active in the morning causing trout to opportunistically feed on Caddis larvae and pupae during the wee hours of the morning. These make excellent fly choices.

    Often large trout cannot be seen sipping insects from long distances as the light recedes or reappears, causing many fly fisherman to overlook a subtle take from a large trout or simply not see them feeding at all. Don’t let this happen to you. When darkness moves in or the sun is far from rising over the mountains, move quietly and slowly to feeding trout. The goal being to perfectly present your fly at shorter distances with laser like precision; Meanwhile staying ever keen using your other senses to detect the presence of nearby gently sipping trout. The next time your on the water and the sun is on its way up or down put this logic to good use and take away the trouts instinctive advantages over you. With a little luck you will put a few more trout in your net. Good luck!

     JW