How to tie an Overhand Loop and get your loops together on your French/Euro Nymphing Leader.

The Loop to Loop connection is a very simple and effective way to connect sections of a leader together. The loop makes replacing your leader fast and painless as well.  Check out the following diagrams and learn how to easily form loops at the end of your leader as well as how to connect them.  There are other loops that you can tie, however this overhand loop in the fastest and simplest way to get you fishing, while its strength and dependability will meet any freshwater challenge.

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loop to loop connection

 

 

As far as French / Euro nymphing I use this Loop to Loop connection to add my coiled sighter to the upper section of leader, and  the bottom section of the leader to the other end of the coiled sighter.   The section of leader below the coiled sighter is very quick and simple to make as its all constructed of the same 5x fluorocarbon. Continue reading

  • How to tie a Nailess Nail knot with an Albright for your French or Euro Nymphing Leader

    click on image for larger view

    click on image for larger view

    The first knot in creating a smooth French/ European Nymphing system is a Nailess Nail knot.  We will use this knot to construct the upper portion of our French/Euro leader out of 30lb and 20lb monofilament that you see in the diagram above. This knot allows the lines to be connected with a strong and slender knot that will pass through rod guides easily, which is important because this upper section of line is the shooting part of your French/Euro leader.  This part of the leader is 18ft long and needs to pass through the eyes easily to avoid problems while casting and landing fish.  As with learning any new knot, at first you may have to take a few deep breathes and try not to curse, but with practice comes perfection. Continue reading

  • French and European Nymphing “Making the Switch?”

    Brown trout caught while using French Nymphing techniqueWhat about you?  Ever think you might like to try French or European Nymphing fly fishing techniques on your home waters someday?  What do you think brought so many other fishermen to decide to do this?  Some reasons for going that route are extensive and variable.  But a couple of driving factors are they have seen or heard that it’s effective and excels at catching plenty of trout.   Many people contemplate it, but quickly get discouraged and do not  actually even get started.  Others don’t take the time to learn enough of what is involved to even know how to get started.

    Have you considered it?  Do you still have questions about whether to test French and European Nymphing fly fishing techniques on your home waters or not?  To help you put things in focus, think about these three points in favor:

    • First,  Casting and Control.  These fly fishing techniques allow you to effectively cast and fish a team of flies much farther from you and fish them with far more control than more traditional nymphing methods.  In traditional nymphing methods the casting is more of an upstream lob or roll cast with heavy weighted flies likely causing a sore arm at the end of the day. Not with the Euro methods, they cast more like a dry fly.  Executing a cast consists of picking your team of nymphs off the water and false casting them back parallel with the river avoiding snags and overhanging limbs such a you would with a dry fly, then catapulting them forward and away from you to the target.  Once the cast is made, immediately the slack is picked up off the water with a few short hand retrievals and the rod is lifted and tilted downstream exposing the coiled or straight sighter (a.k.a indicator) from the water  in a manner that leads the flies through a stretch of water, yet allows them to drift slowly along the bottom.  This is where the good stuff happens!  When the flies have drifted to you, start your false cast and slingshot them forward again into place to repeat the process.  With very little time spent casting and false casting you can really cover some ground with French and European Nymphing techniques. Continue reading
  • 5 Proven Tactics to Help you Catch more Trout during the Hendrickson hatch this Spring.

    Hendrickson Polish woven nymph

         Would you like to you catch more fish during the Hendrickson hatch this spring? There are quite a few ways to approach it, here are some good tactics to try. Some are easy and fast, while others require patience, and some exploration with new techniques, you choose which ones to employ.

         Before you, quite a few people have made up their minds to be more successful at catching fish on the Farmington during these early season hatches, when the fish can sometimes just not seem to respond to anything.  Through the successes and failures of those who went before you, there are many lessons that must be learned.  To make it less difficult for you to succeed, here are a few of the better tactics. The tactics with notably long lists of successful users before.

    5 tactics quite likely to assist you in catching more trout during the Hendrickson and other early mayfly hatches this Spring.

    1.      Fish with nymphs during the first week of the insects hatching. Choosing a nymph in the proper size and color is key. Turn a few rocks and look for some of the naturals before you choose the fly you will be fishing with. For best results you will need to change to some sort of a nymphing setup, there are quite a few out there I prefer my coiled sighters and a host of Euro methods including French/Spanish Nymphing. The other alternative that I like to use especially when its windy is Czech Nymphing with a football indicator or something similar. Continue reading

  • Summertime on the Farmington River.

    Date: 7/20/10
    Water Flow: 220 CFS
    Visibility: clear
    Water Temp: 60F a.m.

    Water Condition: low-water

    Access Point: upper TMA

    Hatches (in order of importance): winter/summer caddis 20-22 a.m., Needhami duns 22-24 midmorning, Isonychia 10-14 p.m., midges 22-20 a.m.

    Comments: The winter summer caddis hatch continues to be a spectacle during the a.m. hours. Many fish line up on soft water seams rising to take these tiny Pupae as they row along in the meniscus to the shoreline to finish their emergence on the rocks and logs near the edge of the river. I had one of my best days on the river this past weekend when this hatch came on at 6a.m. and started winding down at 11a.m., we caught trout on everything from foam pupae patterns to french nymphing small winter/summer caddis larvae patterns.

         Needhami Duns are rolling off the water midmorning, their small spinners can drive fisherman nuts. Their small sizes make them very difficult to see on the water. The Duns however can be recognized flying in the air by their long sweeping tails.

         Isonychia have been filling the skies in the evening hours. Trout like these tasty morsels and will move greater distances from their feeding lanes to swipe at this super sized evening hatcher. When these insects start coming off the water in good numbers I prefer to fish a CDC Iso emerger pattern then as darkness sets in I switch off to a larger Iso parachute pattern, which doubles as a big spinner pattern and I fish this into the darkness.

         If you are fishing mid day I would suggest using terrestrials such as small ants, beetles, crickets, and hoppers. For all those fishing nymphs you can’t be beat fishing green caddis larvae 14-18 and Isonychia nymphs 10-14, with golden stone flies 6-12 rounding out the mix. Fishing on the Farmington River has gotten tougher forcing fishermen to take their tippet down to 7 or 8X when fishing smaller hatches such as winter summer caddis pupae and Needhami Spinners.  Good luck on the river. Remember, if you’re fishing into the afternoon hours, bring plenty of water it has been scorching out there on the river after 10a.m.

    JW