How to tie a Bloodknot

The Bloodknot is another vital knot in setting up a French / Euro leader. The general duties of this knot is to connect sections of line together that have relatively the same line diameter. I use this knot to tie  droppers onto my French Nymphing leader and definitely in my dry fly leaders to bump down to smaller sections of leader.  This knot is very simple to learn and with a little practice, can be tied in no time flat.

  1. Start by crossing the two lines you want to tie together.
  2. twist the tag end on each side around the running line 5 times in opposite directions, holding on to each end when finished.  (I prefer to do this with both hands twisting in opposite directions at the same time) Do whatever is comfortable for you.
  3. Next bring your fingers together and the line will fold and want to form an overhand circle, then I use one hand to form a pinch point and pinch both tag ends at the bottom of the circle.bloodknot
  4. Next I use other hand to pull on either main line and try to open up the twisted line in the center of the twists, then put one tag end through the front side of the opening you created and one tag end through going the opposite direction of the first. Continue reading
  • How to tie a Nailess Nail knot with an Albright for your French or Euro Nymphing Leader

    click on image for larger view

    click on image for larger view

    The first knot in creating a smooth French/ European Nymphing system is a Nailess Nail knot.  We will use this knot to construct the upper portion of our French/Euro leader out of 30lb and 20lb monofilament that you see in the diagram above. This knot allows the lines to be connected with a strong and slender knot that will pass through rod guides easily, which is important because this upper section of line is the shooting part of your French/Euro leader.  This part of the leader is 18ft long and needs to pass through the eyes easily to avoid problems while casting and landing fish.  As with learning any new knot, at first you may have to take a few deep breathes and try not to curse, but with practice comes perfection. Continue reading

  • Farmington fly fishing Memorial Day Weekend 6/1/11

    Nice trout Stan!

    This Memorial Weekend was a stellar weekend for fishing the Farmington River.  The weather stayed good and offered some nice, warm, sunny conditions to fish.  There were lots of Caddis pouring off the river from noontime into the late evening.  Fish on quick water riffles fed on the smorgasbord of Caddis emergers ans the still water fish preferred the adult patterns.  I saw many large fish taken this weekend as the trout consistently fed on the many types of Caddis making their appearance on the Farmington River.  At times fish needed to be hunted down as most fish let Caddis roll over them one after another  and  at other times some fishermen were just in the right place at the right time as large concentrations of insects emerged from the depths.  Fishing nymphs this weekend was especially rewarding for me and many others that I talked with along the river.  Many Caddis patterns such as czech Caddis, Lafontaine Caddis patterns,and many others were good performers in #14-16.  My Kahle worms also caught fish for me all weekend used as my anchor fly.  Finally we have spotted some #16 Sulphurs in the upper TMA and a few fish were caught earlier in the week on the Sulphur emergers.

    A well colored Farmington River meat eater!

    Thanks Mike S. for the great picture.

  • Farmington Needhami, Breakfast of Champions!

    Needhami Dun

    Date: 7/5/10

    Water Flow: 250 CFS

    Visibility: clear

    Water Temp: 58F

    Water Condition: good

    Access Point: upper TMA

    Hatches (in order of importance): a.m. Needhami Spinners size 22-24, winter/summer caddis size 18-22, p.m.Sulphurs size 16-20, Isonychia size 10-14, Cream Cahills 14-16, Rusty spinners 12-20.

    Comments: Like clockwork the trout continue feeding on winter summer caddis in the mornings, with foam pupae patterns performing the best,and many trout coming to the net on small pupae patterns while nymphing. When the Needhami spinners hit the water in mid morning, trout boil to take them. You must look at the water closely to see these tiny spinners. The long tails are a dead giveaway. The key after recognizing these insects is to lighten your tippet size and accurately cast to feeding fish making sure your drifts are drag-free.

    The evening Sulphur Hatch remains good with lots of Duns coming off the water and good numbers of fish feeding on them. I am having good luck fishing a Sulphur emerger as a dropper off of my dry fly. There are also Isonychia mixed in, with plenty of fish willing to strike at these big meaty flies. Gently tickling or twitching Isonychia patterns replicates their struggles to emerge. Trout will travel great distances and strike hard and fast at the commotion caused by these insects.

    There have been some Cream Cahills sneaking into the mix of insects. I have observed several fish whom at first glance appeared to be taking Sulphurs, upon further investigation they were actually taking Cream Cahill spinners exclusively.

    Spinners can reliably be seen overhead in the late evening sky. Their dark fluttering silhouettes drift by in the soon to be darkness in a vast array of sizes. Rusty spinners right before dark and before daybreak are still accounting for our bigger trout.

    Happy Hunting! 

    JW

  • Farmington River Serenity and Sulphurs!

     

    Date: 6/23/10

    Water Flow: 236

    Visibility: good

    Water Temp: 52*F am

    Water Condition: low

    Access Point: upper TMA

     Hatches (in order of importance): Sulphurs 16-20, March Brown/Grey Fox 12-14, Isonychia 10-12, Winter/Summer Caddis 18-20 am, Blue Winged Olives 16-20 evenings and foul weather, Tan and Green Caddis 16-20

     Comments: The water this week has fallen below 300 Cfs, the need for much finer tippets will be upon us soon. The Sulphur hatches in the afternoon have been lackluster for me and I have purposely been fishing the sulphurs that are coming off in the late evening, taking nice trout on both the dun and the emerger. When nymphing I use tags on my leader to attach emerger patterns, but when I am fishing dries I drop an emerger off the bend of the hook. Some people say its a pain and I couldn’t disagree with them more, it catches fish period. Not to mention how many times it saved my neck when fish were feeding exclusively on emergers. Sulphur spinners have been working well at last light, some fish have been feeding solely on them and its taken me a while to catch on. When I responded I went straight to a Sulphur spinner and Bingo! The presence of the Isonychia has me overflowing with joy! I love these bugs, they are big and meaty and easily seen and the fish just love them. I had an outing this weekend where I made it a point to catch fish on all stages of Isonychia and the fish responded eagerly. The morning Winter/Summer Caddis hatches are still producing good numbers of trout, when the sun pokes over the trees its scary what you might turn on a 18-22 foam Caddis Pupae. French Nymphing any of these hatches has been dynamite producing good healthy fish. I would recommend fishing with this method at the front end of a hatch before fish are feeding on duns. I have been fishing with less weight and adding wetflies or emerger patterns as my dropper. I lost a fish the other day in a foot of water. I thought I was snagged and I pulled on the rod twice to try and free it, then it pulled back and with a head shake and my 5x fluorocarbon gave under the strain. Enjoy the warmer weather and good luck to you all and we at JWFlyfishing hope to see you soon on the Farmington River.

    JW