How to tie a Bloodknot

The Bloodknot is another vital knot in setting up a French / Euro leader. The general duties of this knot is to connect sections of line together that have relatively the same line diameter. I use this knot to tie  droppers onto my French Nymphing leader and definitely in my dry fly leaders to bump down to smaller sections of leader.  This knot is very simple to learn and with a little practice, can be tied in no time flat.

  1. Start by crossing the two lines you want to tie together.
  2. twist the tag end on each side around the running line 5 times in opposite directions, holding on to each end when finished.  (I prefer to do this with both hands twisting in opposite directions at the same time) Do whatever is comfortable for you.
  3. Next bring your fingers together and the line will fold and want to form an overhand circle, then I use one hand to form a pinch point and pinch both tag ends at the bottom of the circle.bloodknot
  4. Next I use other hand to pull on either main line and try to open up the twisted line in the center of the twists, then put one tag end through the front side of the opening you created and one tag end through going the opposite direction of the first. Continue reading
  • French and European Nymphing “Making the Switch?”

    Brown trout caught while using French Nymphing techniqueWhat about you?  Ever think you might like to try French or European Nymphing fly fishing techniques on your home waters someday?  What do you think brought so many other fishermen to decide to do this?  Some reasons for going that route are extensive and variable.  But a couple of driving factors are they have seen or heard that it’s effective and excels at catching plenty of trout.   Many people contemplate it, but quickly get discouraged and do not  actually even get started.  Others don’t take the time to learn enough of what is involved to even know how to get started.

    Have you considered it?  Do you still have questions about whether to test French and European Nymphing fly fishing techniques on your home waters or not?  To help you put things in focus, think about these three points in favor:

    • First,  Casting and Control.  These fly fishing techniques allow you to effectively cast and fish a team of flies much farther from you and fish them with far more control than more traditional nymphing methods.  In traditional nymphing methods the casting is more of an upstream lob or roll cast with heavy weighted flies likely causing a sore arm at the end of the day. Not with the Euro methods, they cast more like a dry fly.  Executing a cast consists of picking your team of nymphs off the water and false casting them back parallel with the river avoiding snags and overhanging limbs such a you would with a dry fly, then catapulting them forward and away from you to the target.  Once the cast is made, immediately the slack is picked up off the water with a few short hand retrievals and the rod is lifted and tilted downstream exposing the coiled or straight sighter (a.k.a indicator) from the water  in a manner that leads the flies through a stretch of water, yet allows them to drift slowly along the bottom.  This is where the good stuff happens!  When the flies have drifted to you, start your false cast and slingshot them forward again into place to repeat the process.  With very little time spent casting and false casting you can really cover some ground with French and European Nymphing techniques. Continue reading
  • 5 Proven Tactics to Help you Catch more Trout during the Hendrickson hatch this Spring.

    Hendrickson Polish woven nymph

         Would you like to you catch more fish during the Hendrickson hatch this spring? There are quite a few ways to approach it, here are some good tactics to try. Some are easy and fast, while others require patience, and some exploration with new techniques, you choose which ones to employ.

         Before you, quite a few people have made up their minds to be more successful at catching fish on the Farmington during these early season hatches, when the fish can sometimes just not seem to respond to anything.  Through the successes and failures of those who went before you, there are many lessons that must be learned.  To make it less difficult for you to succeed, here are a few of the better tactics. The tactics with notably long lists of successful users before.

    5 tactics quite likely to assist you in catching more trout during the Hendrickson and other early mayfly hatches this Spring.

    1.      Fish with nymphs during the first week of the insects hatching. Choosing a nymph in the proper size and color is key. Turn a few rocks and look for some of the naturals before you choose the fly you will be fishing with. For best results you will need to change to some sort of a nymphing setup, there are quite a few out there I prefer my coiled sighters and a host of Euro methods including French/Spanish Nymphing. The other alternative that I like to use especially when its windy is Czech Nymphing with a football indicator or something similar. Continue reading

  • Summertime action on the Farmington River!

    The summer is a wonderful time to enjoy the cool flows of the Farmington River. When the weather gets hot and balmy I look forward to the cool air that engulf the riverbank. Whether you find yourself dry fly fishing in a hatch of Sulphur Duns or probing the banks with large terrestrials, there is no doubt that the Farmington River in the midst of summer is a terrific place for any fly angler. Though the dry fly fishing can be great this time of year, a succesful fly angler must realize the importance of fly fishing nymphs to dredge the larger weary fish from their lies. The Farmington River is host to huge populations of Stoneflies and Caddis in many sizes that trout go nuts on during the summer months! Trout can be seen from the banks grubbing and turning stones along the river bottom flashing from side to side as they dislodge rocks and pick off their favorite food items. Many of these trout can be taken by a fly angler that is willing to incorporate a different fly fishing technique into his normal repetoire. No matter what your preference one thing is for certain. The Farmington River is a great place to frolic, bask in the sun and enjoy your summer with family and friends catching some beautiful trout. Good luck out there and hope to see you on the river soon.
    JW

  • Hendrickson Vs. Kahle Worm – Two Heavyweight flies, One Winner!


    There was some great fishing to be had along the banks of the Farmington River this spring, the weather made some of the Hendrickson dry fly fishing very challenging, but with a very solid Plan “B” the results were a whole lot of fun and some terrific scenery.   Continue reading