Salmon River-Renew your vows of “Chasing Chrome” this spring!

 
   
Salmon River, Pulaski NY-  As Spring slowly materializes the opening of the upper fly zone in Altmar will attract many anglers looking to hook into some fresh lake run fish to the Salmon River.  My recent trip last fall has me anxiuos for more!

      After the early ride from northwestern CT I feast my eyes for the first time on one of the most fantastic Great Lakes fishery along with the rising sun.  I throw my gear on and as soon as I reach the river I am greeted with the smell of  dead fish from the recent runs of  salmon.  These ghastly beast are strewn about the river with the current faintly animating their dead flesh as they stink to high heavens!  The smell doesn’t last long though, my predatory instincts override my sense of smell as I begin to assess the river.. after seeing a shadow here and a shadow there, the potential of this fishery becomes immeditately apparent (Dorothy, you are not, in Kansas anymore!).  

     Dead drifting egg patterns, small Stonefly nymphs, and Sucker Spawn type flies account for a good number of fish and when combined with a 6 or 7 weight fly rod, decent reel, and floating line, are all that is really required to get you in on the action there. 

     Weight is an important factor here and any angler should be in possession of a container of lead-free shot, to get his flies down to the bottom of the river.  No need to worry about some crazy 60-70ft presentation you think those steelhead guys might be doing.  A short upstream czech nymph cast and  deadrift presentation works well on runs where fish periodically move through and rest along current seams. 

     For many fisherman this place truly holds the “Fish of a Lifetime” and will leave most angler chomping at the bit for a return visit.  This was a great trip, I would highly recommend to any fishing fanatic that has never been there to drop what you are doing and to plan a trip to the Salmon River, Pulaski NY this spring and renew your vows of “Chasing Chrome” with back breaking rod bends, ferocious runs, and epic battles these Great Lakes trout and salmon have to offer!I anxiously wait for my next opportunity to return to the Salmon River and enjoy its great fishing.  Hope to see you soon on the river!  There are some great photos already in our Flickr’ stream located at the bottom right hand corner of our website.

JW

  • Dog days of Summer on the Farmington River 2010.

    Date: 8/9/I0

    Water Flow: 200 CFS

    Visibility: clear

    Water Temp: 59F a.m.

    Water Condition: low

    Access Point: upper TMA

    Hatches (in order of importance:

    A.M.

    Tricos 22-26

    Winter/summer Caddis 18-22

    Tan Caddis 16-18

    Needhami 22-24

    Midday

    Ants, Beetles, and other terrestrials should do the trick.

    P.M.

    Isonychia 10-14

    Anthopotamus 10-12

    Comments: Tricos are coming off in the upper TMA, the Duns start showing up in the early a.m. shortly followed by the spinners into midmorning. I haven’t seen any blanket hatches of these insects by any means, hopefully this hatch will materialize into the lower sections of the river this week.

    Winter/summer Caddis are still blowing up the rivers’ edge in the a.m. hours. This is my favorite hatch and it is still going on each morning from the crack of dawn into the late morning. This hatch could almost be fished 365 days a year here on the Farmington River.

    Tan Caddis are coming off throughout the day and fish slash at them making loud and splashy rise forms, sometimes launching into a full body breech as they chase these emerging pupae.

    Isonychia have been emerging in good numbers in the evening hours. We have been fishing them at last light and into the darkness. Usually shortly after sunset there is a very strong emergence and fish ruthlessly give chase. Anthopotamus or formally known as Potomanthus, nicknamed Golden Dun, hatch and emerge on the slower sections of the Farmington in fairly good numbers during the evening hours. Given their large size take off can be slow and clumsy causing many fish to give chase. Fishing a yellow parachute style fly during late evening can double as the Golden Dun spinner, which also can be seen at the same time as the emerging Duns.

    The water is low but we are still having fun and catching lots of fish. I would like to especially thank my nephew Tyler for taking time out of his busy summer and spending it with my family here in Connecticut and on the Farmington River. Tyler, I speak for all of us here at JWflyfishing when I say “We had a great two weeks visiting with you and having you fish along our side.” We look forward to doing it again. Great luck out there to all!